Theatre News

India

Lady Constance Lytton was the daughter of a Viceroy of India, born in 1869, so an archetypal, upper class, Victorian young woman.

The English Touring Opera (ETO) is bringing a series of productions to Saffron Hall as part of the venue’s autumn season.

Rome

As Raymond, the savant would say: This is definitely the best play at Cambridge Arts Theatre this year. Definitely the best play....

The first night audience at the venue stood up to applaud and Cambridge audiences rarely give anyone a standing ovation, I say rarely, I mean never.

Cambridge

No Surrender, the celebrated show about an unlikely suffragette, Lady Constance Lytton, who disguised herself as a poor woman because the police refused to arrest a lady - and then wrote the first book about prison from an inmate’s point of view, returns to Cambridge Junction.

Cambridge

The stage version of Rain Man is tipped to be the best show at Cambridge Arts Theatre so far this year and in a special offer for readers, tickets for the performances Monday to Thursday, October 8 to 11 are available for £20.

archant

Written by and starring Adrian Edmondson and Nigel Planer, Vulcan 7 is a vingette of two actors who have loathed each other since RADA. Their jealously knows no bounds.

The Dunmow Players are limbering up for their production of Little Shop of Horrors, a musical which will include a gigantic man-eating plant that will take up half of the stage when fully grown.

This is a clever play. So much so that you might feel you want to see it twice to understand it.

My companion spotted Mathew Horne at Paddington Station. We were getting the same series of trains to Windsor where he is starring in a stage version of Rain Man, which arrives next week, from Monday, October 1, at Cambridge Arts Theatre.

Cambridge

It seems that The Globe is so utterly bored with Shakespeare’s plays that it will do anything to amuse itself, regardless of whether that results in something entertaining for the paying public.

The musical Sweet Charity is in the Great Hall at The Leys School in Cambridge until Saturday, July 14, presented by Cambridge Theatre Company.

Cambridge

This is a sweet play about a poignant, true story. The performances are virtuoso from actors who are masters of their craft.

Fiona Bruce

Mischief Movie Night, a play that improvises a movie on stage - after the audience has suggested a genre, location and title, will be at Cambridge Arts Theatre from June 19-23.

Cambridge

This is not a traditional version of A Midsummer Night’s Dream. It takes terrible liberties but it is definitely a play for today. At one point, there is literally a bun fight - joined in by the audience who were screaming with laughter.

Back at the venue for a third time, having sold out for the last two runs, The Play that Goes Wrong will be at Cambridge Arts Theatre from May 28 to June 2.

Tracy Beaker Gets Real, based on the book by Jacqueline Wilson about a little girl growing up in care, is at Cambridge Junction on Sunday, June 10.

Cambridge

The faded Southern Belle, Blanche DuBois in Tennessee Williams’ play A Streetcar Named Desire is one of the most difficult roles to perform.

Two powerful women walk on to the stage in identical clothes, black velvet trouser suits. There is a thrill of tension. One will play Mary Stuart, Mary Queen of Scots, the other will play Queen Elizabeth I. The audience doesn’t know who will play who, and neither do they. At each performance, the spin of a coin will decide. When the courtiers bow to the queen, the die is cast, the play starts.

Henry VIII

Everything that opera can do is here. English Touring Opera’s double bill of short Puccini operas, which reached Cambridge Arts Theatre this week (April 16-21) included the tragic Il Tabarro (the cloak) and the comic opera Gianni Schicchi named after a character who deceives all the others to do a good deed.

Paris

On the first night of The Importance of Being Earnest in 1895 the story goes that the father of Oscar Wilde’s lover, Bosie, planned to disrupt the play by throwing rotten fruit. Wilde got wind of the plan and The Marquess of Queensbury was refused entrance to the theatre. If the playwright had seen this production by The Original Theatre Company, he might have welcomed him in.

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