Antiques Roadshow at Audley End attracts thousands of visitors

Crowds at the Antiques Roadshow at Audley End House

Crowds at the Antiques Roadshow at Audley End House - Credit: Archant

Thousands of people descended on Audley End House on Thursday, May 26, with their treasured objects to be analysed by the team of experts from the Antiques Roadshow.

Fiona Bruce at Audley End

Fiona Bruce at Audley End - Credit: Archant

The popular BBC programme, now in its 39th series, filmed from 9.30am to 4.30pm at the English Heritage site, and a wide range of items were put forward to Fiona Bruce and company.

Among the interesting objects was a collection of trumpets and bugels from the 1940s, a sledge, and a suit of armour from the 16th century.

The team of 26 experts dissected each object and everyone who got through the Audley End gates before 4.30pm was able to get their items seen.

Presenter Fiona Bruce, who is now in her ninth series, said: “I have never been to Audley End before, but it is an absolutely stunning venue.

Expert Paul Atterbury

Expert Paul Atterbury - Credit: Archant


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“There is this quite beautiful symmetry and elegance about the building, and it is a perfect location for the Antiques Roadshow.

“The people who bring their bits and bobs and unusual objects really make the programme what it is and it’s fantastic to see so many of them here today.”

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Expert Paul Atterbury, dressed in a fetching tie and blazer combination, said: “I have visited Audley End before and it is exactly what we want for the roadshow.

“It’s a great day out for people to bring their objects, find out they’re worth nothing, have a picnic and go home.”

Carol De Oliveira, with her green Indian horn

Carol De Oliveira, with her green Indian horn - Credit: Archant

The filming at Audley End is expected to be edited into two one-hour programmes, which will be shown in either September or October.

Carol De Oliveira, from Saffron Walden, was interested to find out more about a green horn that had been in her family for a long time.

She said: “I assume someone in the family picked it up on their travels, but I’d really like to find out what it is. I don’t think it’s very valuable, I’m just more interested in the history.

After seeing an expert, Carol said: “He told me it was an 150-year-old Indian ceremonial piece that has no great value. But it was good to find out.”

Lella Yates (left) and Marion Gillman with their objects

Lella Yates (left) and Marion Gillman with their objects - Credit: Archant

Vic Ranger, from Dunmow, brought a collection of theatrical costume drawings by designer Carl Bonn from the 1930s.

He said: “I’ve brought them here for a friend, and he has already had interest in them from people at Harvard and at the Victoria and Albert Museum. But he wanted to get an opinion from the experts here.”

After seeing expert Bunny Campione, Vic said: “She was very helpful and said there were unique. She didn’t give us a price, but I know my friend has already had estimates in the £3,000 range.”

Friends Lella Yates and Marion Gillman, from Saffron Walden, brought a selection of items between them that they thought may be of interest to the experts.

Julia Goodwin (right) with her bedspread

Julia Goodwin (right) with her bedspread - Credit: Archant

Marion said: “It is a wonderful event for Saffron Walden, and everyone is in such good spirits. I have already seen such a wide range of different items and people are very happy to talk about them.

Julia Goodwin, from Ashdon, had an interesting bedspread to speak to the experts about.

She said: “It belonged to a lady called Clarice Stevenson, who was a teacher at a school in Birmingham and when she had to leave to look after her elderly mother in 1945, her pupils made it for her.”

Sally Harris, 63, from Clavering, had her dad’s caul with her to show the experts.

Sally Harris, from Clavering, with her dad's caul

Sally Harris, from Clavering, with her dad's caul - Credit: Archant

She said: “My dad was born in Calcutta in 1918 and his caul has been passed on to me. They were once very highly valued, particularly by sailors who thought if they had one, they wouldn’t drown.

After seeing expert Paul Atterbury, Sally said: “He said it was very difficult to put a price on these days, but it was extremely rare.

But I wonder whether someone in the field of research might be interested in taking a look at it. It may well be of use to someone.”

Stephen Lang, from near Saffron Walden, came along with a wheelbarrow full of a suit of armour to wow the experts.

Stephen Lang with his suit of armour

Stephen Lang with his suit of armour - Credit: Archant

He said: “The legs have gone, but the top half remains very much in tact. I believe it to be from the 16th century but I’m interested in getting a more exact date. I acquired it from an ex-employer from a country house near Harlow and have got some of the provenance. I have had estimates of £12,000 previously.”

Philippa and Caroline Whalley, and Marcus Lindfors, from Great Chesterford, brought a wooden panel and knife and were interested to find more about the history of the objects.

Philippa said: “We really want to find out more about them and where they originated from really. The queues are long, but it’s a lovely day here at Audley End.”

Martin Addison Atkinson dragged a sledge along the Audley End grounds to get the opinion of the experts.

Philippa Whalley, (right) with Caroline Whalley and Marcus Lindfors

Philippa Whalley, (right) with Caroline Whalley and Marcus Lindfors - Credit: Archant

He said: “I never seen another one like this, but on the opening credits of the Antiques Roadshow, there is one similar on the wall of the barn, so I’m really keen to see what they say about it. I believe it to be over 60 years old.”

Jack Doughty, 84, from Stansted, brought his collection of trumpets and bugels from the 1940s onwards.

Jack played the Last Post at the Armistice Day service at the war memorial in Whitehall in 1948 and 1949, and was interested to find out the value of his 10 instruments.

He said: “It’s not vitally important of course, but it’s always nice to know what they might be worth. I have been to an Antiques Roadshow before and waited around two hours to be seen, but with the crowds here today, it looks like it might be a bit longer.”

Martin Addison Atkinson with his sledge

Martin Addison Atkinson with his sledge - Credit: Archant

Angela Fitzsimmons, from Stansted, and mother-in-law Cilla Spray, from Saffron Walden, had a collection of items from Cilla’s mother’s house in Castle Street, Saffron Walden, including what they believe are water buffalo horns.

Angela said: “The horns used to be on the wall at Cilla’s mother’s home, and we’re really keen to find out exactly what sort of animal it comes from.”

Jack Doughty, from Stansted, plays his trumpet

Jack Doughty, from Stansted, plays his trumpet - Credit: Archant

Angela Fitzsimmons and mother-in-law Cilla Spray, with their objects

Angela Fitzsimmons and mother-in-law Cilla Spray, with their objects - Credit: Archant

Vic Ranger, from Dunmow, with his collection of costume drawings from the 1930s

Vic Ranger, from Dunmow, with his collection of costume drawings from the 1930s - Credit: Archant

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