Cossack dancing at school

PUBLISHED: 15:19 17 March 2008 | UPDATED: 21:24 31 May 2010

Cossack Dancing.
Dame Bradbury School, Saffron Walden.
March 14, 2008.
Photograph by Michael Boyton.
Pic shows: Hugh teaches Euan and Alexander a moveski.
Names (L-R): Hugh Rathbone (Cossack dancer); Euan Buchanan; Alexander Brett (both year 4 pupils).

Cossack Dancing. Dame Bradbury School, Saffron Walden. March 14, 2008. Photograph by Michael Boyton. Pic shows: Hugh teaches Euan and Alexander a moveski. Names (L-R): Hugh Rathbone (Cossack dancer); Euan Buchanan; Alexander Brett (both year 4 pupils).

COSSACK dancing was one of the more unusual subjects added to the school curriculum on Friday. Youngsters at Dame Bradbury s School in Saffron Walden were taught a number of impressive dance moves including catswings , cobblers and coachman for Russi

COSSACK dancing was one of the more unusual subjects added to the school curriculum on Friday.

Youngsters at Dame Bradbury's School in Saffron Walden were taught a number of impressive dance moves including "catswings", "cobblers" and "coachman" for Russia day - one of a series of regular multi-cultural events at the school.

Headteacher Jane Crouch said: "This has been an unforgettable day, full of unusual and new experiences for all the children.

"Whether leaping like dervishes or acting out Peter and the Wolf, they have all had a wonderful glimpse into another country's culture."

All the children, from three to 11 years old, had the chance to learn Cossack dance routines with members of the Volkovtski Cossack Dance Group.

The school also welcomed two teachers from the Cambridge Russian School, Elena McKaik and Irena Kell, who spoke about Russia's culture and history during Assembly and held workshops with quizzes, games and vocabulary. By the end of the day, the pupils could read various words in Russian, including football, taxi, computer and Prince Charles.

Other activities included decorating Russian dolls and eggs, making typical clay models, cooking Russian pancakes with figs, jam and spices, learning about Russian composers such as Prokofiev and Mussorgsky, and listening to Russian folk tales.


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