Don’t pull train’s emergency cord if there is a medical emergency, Greater Anglia passengers told

PUBLISHED: 10:12 18 October 2017 | UPDATED: 11:15 18 October 2017

People should to arrive at a station - such as Audley End - before pulling the emergency cord. Picture: SAFFRON PHOTO

People should to arrive at a station - such as Audley End - before pulling the emergency cord. Picture: SAFFRON PHOTO

SaffronPhoto 2016

Train passengers using Greater Anglia services are being asked not to pull the emergency cord for a medical incident on board, but instead to call 999 – and take to Twitter.

The rail operator has teamed up with the region’s ambulance service and given a new process – which will see control rooms work together to reach sick passengers as quickly as possible .

Bosses are warning if a passenger pulls the emergency cord, the train may stop between stations – which could make the service inaccessible for a conventional ambulance.

According to chiefs, medical help will arrive more quickly at a station, where the passenger can be taken off the train and treated.

In the event of a life-threatening emergency, passengers are being asked to dial 999 for an ambulance. They are also encouraged to let staff on board know and contact Greater Anglia on Twitter.

A Greater Anglia spokesman said: “Pulling the cord or pressing the emergency button to stop the train not only means the ill passenger has to wait longer for medical assistance, but it also causes delays to the service, which can sometimes lead to people on other delayed trains becoming ill.

“Last year, trains were delayed by the equivalent of seven days due to passengers becoming ill on trains on the Greater Anglia network.”

Train service delivery director Richard Dean added: “We want the best for our customers – and this includes making sure if they fall ill they get help as soon as possible.

“This is the first time we’ve worked in this way with the East of England Ambulance Service Trust (EEAST).”

Gary Morgan, EEAST deputy director of service delivery, said the service is for emergencies such as cardiac arrests, severe burns, unconsciousness and traumatic injuries.

He added: “During a life-threatening emergency it is important to stay calm and take actions that will help the patient.

“Pulling the emergency cord and stopping the train between stations will make it more difficult for ambulance staff to reach the patient.

“If you call 999, please answer the questions asked as this will enable us to send the most appropriate response.”

What do you think of the new strategy? Send your views to editor@dunmow-broadcast.co.uk or editor@saffronwalden-reporter.co.uk

0 comments

Welcome , please leave your message below.

Optional - JPG files only
Optional - MP3 files only
Optional - 3GP, AVI, MOV, MPG or WMV files
Comments

Please log in to leave a comment and share your views with other Saffron Walden Reporter visitors.

We enable people to post comments with the aim of encouraging open debate.

Only people who register and sign up to our terms and conditions can post comments. These terms and conditions explain our house rules and legal guidelines.

Comments are not edited by Saffron Walden Reporter staff prior to publication but may be automatically filtered.

If you have a complaint about a comment please contact us by clicking on the Report This Comment button next to the comment.

Not a member yet?

Register to create your own unique Saffron Walden Reporter account for free.

Signing up is free, quick and easy and offers you the chance to add comments, personalise the site with local information picked just for you, and more.

Sign up now

More news stories

A former Grade II listed five bedroom medieval hall house in Newport, dating back to the 16th century, with reputed links to the notable diarist, Samuel Pepys, has gone on the market.

Yesterday, 13:54

A group of people who breached Stansted Airport’s security fence before chaining themselves together in front of a plane were convicted today (December 10).

Legally-owned guns are being targeted and stolen from rural homes across Essex, a police chief has said.

Great Dunmow Rotary Club raised more than £1,250 to help end polio by dining on a frugal slice of bread and soup at Dunmow restaurant on October 25.

Digital Edition

Image
Read the Saffron Walden Reporter e-edition E-edition

Most read stories

Newsletter Sign Up

Saffron Walden Reporter weekly newsletter
Sign up to receive our regular email newsletter

Our Privacy Policy