Drugs talk for Essex parents

PUBLISHED: 17:26 10 September 2008 | UPDATED: 14:08 10 May 2010

Crack cocaine

Crack cocaine

DRUGS is a word that encapsulates many parents biggest fears for their children. Whether they become socially dependent on cannabis or hooked on crack, it is every parent s nightmare to discover that their child has become addicted to drugs. Drug use can

DRUGS is a word that encapsulates many parents' biggest fears for their children.

Whether they become socially dependent on cannabis or hooked on crack, it is every parent's nightmare to discover that their child has become addicted to drugs.

Drug use can ruin families, lay waste to young people's prospects and destroy both mental and physical health, of that there is no doubt. But parts of the media could sometimes be accused of hysteria on the subject, of not covering drug-related stories in a responsible and reasonable way.

Who could forget Chris Morris' inspired Brass Eye episode satirising the media's attitude towards drugs through the fictitious substance 'Cake'? Politicians and celebrities were all too keen to participate in the programme, mindlessly jumping on the anti-drugs bandwagon despite being told the very substance they were warning against was a 'made-up drug'.

Fortunately parents can get a more realistic idea of how drugs can affect their children at a talk taking place on Tuesday and a six-session course beginning on Thursday October 9.

Tuesday's talk, taking place in Saffron Screen at 7pm, will be given by Karen Richardson, an experienced counsellor with firsthand experience of parenting a child on drugs.

Karen's daughter Georgie started snorting cocaine when she was 14; by 16 she was hopelessly addicted to crack and had been thrown out of the home.

Karen's experience of her daughter's ordeal, and their eventual overcoming of it, has given her a great perspective on drug use among teenagers which she now shares with concerned parents at talks such as the one on Tuesday.

The talk is being held in aid of charity Homestart Uttlesford. Tickets, at £10, are available from Saffron Walden Tourist Information Centre.

Then on October 9, the course 'How to Drug-Proof Your Kids' begins at Saffron Walden Baptist Church.

Kirstie Mattholie, who is running the course in conjunction with Angela Sabey, said: "I think every parent is concerned about this issue and they will find the course very helpful in allaying fears and building relationships with their children."

The six-session course costs just £15, which will cover refreshment and materials costs. It has been designed for parents of children aged nine to 13.

The first session runs from 7.30pm to 9.30pm. Booking is essential - call Kirstie on 01799 522230, Angela on 01799 501963 or e-mail a.sabey@btinternet.com to register an interest.

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Saffron Walden Reporter