Get ready for children's online festival for bookworms this Easter

Cambridge Literary Festival director Cathy Moore. Picture: Martin Bond

Cambridge Literary Festival director Cathy Moore. - Credit: Martin Bond

A special book festival designed for children will be entertaining youngsters online this Easter.

Cambridge Literary Festival has got the Easter holidays covered, with a range of entertaining and educational events for all the family.

Festival director Cathy Moore said: “For the first time we are running our children’s events as a stand-alone Children’s Festival over the whole of the Easter holidays.

"The response we have from children is always fantastic and a great addition to our main festival.

"I hope that by offering access for the entire holiday and being online means children can meet their favourite authors and be introduced to new ones from wherever they are, whenever they want to.”

All events will be broadcast over Sunday, March 28 to Wednesday, March 31, and then available to watch throughout the Easter holidays until Sunday, April 11.

Books Palm Trees at the North Pole, The Hospital Dog, Claude at the Palace and While We Can’t Hug.

Marc ter Horst introduces Palm Trees at the North Pole at the Children's Festival Online. Julia Donaldson, former Children’s Laureate and author of The Gruffalo, will be bringing her new book The Hospital Dog to life, while illustrator and author Alex T. Smith will host a live event about Claude at the Palace. Addressing lockdown for little ones, Eoin McLaughlin and Polly Dunbar present While We Can’t Hug. - Credit: Supplied by Cambridge Literary Festival

Julia Donaldson, former Children’s Laureate and author of The Gruffalo, will be bringing to life her new book The Hospital Dog.

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You can draw along at a live event with illustrator and author Alex T. Smith, who has a royal outing with Claude at the Palace.

BookTrust Writer in Residence Smriti Halls returns after her delightful Winter Festival appearance with her new book, Not That Pet.

Addressing lockdown for little ones, Eion McLaughlin and Polly Dunbar present the adorable Hedgehog and Tortoise in While We Can’t Hug.

Books A Climate in Chaos, Not That Pet and Hey, Who's in the Loo?

Neal Layton presents A Climate in Chaos at the Children's Festival, while professor of psychology Dr Charlotte Markwill debunk body image myths. Smriti Halls returns with her new book Not That Pet, and Harmen van Straaten wonders Who’s in the Loo? - Credit: Supplied by Cambridge Literary Festival

Chris Lloyd talks to David Long about The World's Most Magnificent Machines.

Performance poet and author Joseph Coelho and illustrator Fiona Lumbers tell us why Luna Loves Art and introduces children to the likes of Van Gogh, Rousseau, Damien Hirst and more.

Dutch writer Harmen van Straaten wonders Who’s in the Loo?, and Marc ter Horst introduces Palm Trees at the North Pole.

For slightly older children, parents and guardians, professor of psychology Dr Charlotte Markey will debunk body image myths with her latest book, The Body Image Book for Girls, and next book The Body Image Book for Boys.

And with the climate crisis still close to many young people’s hearts and minds, the festival once again turns its attention to the environment.

Illustrator Neal Layton will be live online encouraging everyone to pick up their colouring pencils and join in as he presents his book Climate in Chaos.

Children’s programmer Sabine Edwards said: "I am so excited for this Children's Festival, especially as we have the whole Easter break to celebrate stories, illustration, the environment, body image and so much more.

"While We Can't Hug at the moment, we can read, draw and talk to our hearts content!

"We will have so much fun with big conversations, stories and activities– there really is something for all ages, and grown-ups are welcome, too.”

With events for children of all ages, from two to 15, there’s plenty to occupy young minds, and a festival pass for just £15 provides access to all events.

Tickets are available at www.cambridgeliteraryfestival.com


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