Father aims to climb Mount Kilimanjaro for National Autistic Society

PUBLISHED: 11:09 13 November 2009 | UPDATED: 22:03 31 May 2010

Walking up Mount Kilimanjaro.
Saffron Walden.
November 07, 2009.
Photograph by Michael Boyton.
Pic shows: Warren and Nathaniel with some walking boots.
Names (L-R): Nathaniel Elsom (aged 10); Warren Elsom.

Walking up Mount Kilimanjaro. Saffron Walden. November 07, 2009. Photograph by Michael Boyton. Pic shows: Warren and Nathaniel with some walking boots. Names (L-R): Nathaniel Elsom (aged 10); Warren Elsom.

A FATHER whose son lives with severe autism is preparing to scale the world s highest free-standing mountain in a bid to raise cash for the National Autistic Society (NAS). Warren Elsom, from The Spike in Saffron Walden, will be part of trekking team atte

A FATHER whose son lives with severe autism is preparing to scale the world's highest free-standing mountain in a bid to raise cash for the National Autistic Society (NAS).

Warren Elsom, from The Spike in Saffron Walden, will be part of trekking team attempting to scale a 20,000ft mountain in Tanzania - Mount Kilimanjaro.

It is a challenge he his taking on for his 10-year-old son Nathanial and the charity that helps to support him.

Mr Elsom said: "Unfortunately autism doesn't receive a great amount of publicity but this is an issue that is very close to my heart. Therefore I am determined to raise as much money and awareness as possible for this organisation."

The adventurous fundraiser has set himself a target of £3500 and he has persuaded his colleague Paul Naylor to join him on the trek and support the cause.

Nathanial, who attends the specialist Heathside School in Ipswich, has no speech skills or life skills and requires 24-hour care.

Mr Elsom will be among a team of 24 trekkers, as well as medics and doctors, when the party leaves in January.

The challenge is not for the feint-hearted and, although he admits it will be "tough", Mr Elsom, 39, said: "I have been training on and off for the last couple of months - I've just come back from the peak district training. It's going to be absolutely fine."

People with autism struggle with social development in communication, interaction, and imagination, and could display love of routines and learning disabilities.

The National Autistic Society, founded in 1962 by parents whose children had the condition, has 18000 members and 80 branches, helping the 2.3 million people who are affected by autism.

If you wish to sponsor Mr Elsom in his quest to raise the organisation's profile logon to www.justgiving.co.uk/warrenelsom

For more information on the National Autistic Society visit www.nas.org.uk


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