Historical Society

PUBLISHED: 13:09 10 November 2006 | UPDATED: 09:59 31 May 2010

At the October meeting, the speaker was Maria Medlycott from Essex County Council s archaeology section. Ms Medlycott showed how the present day Essex landscape can be related to its human and economic history, which initially was determined by its geolog

At the October meeting, the speaker was Maria Medlycott from Essex County Council's archaeology section. Ms Medlycott showed how the present day Essex landscape can be related to its human and economic history, which initially was determined by its geology. Her talk was illustrated with many maps and aerial photographs. Essex is a very settled, stable area. It was well organised by Roman times, and 95 per cent of the names in Domesday records are still here. All but the northwest part of the county was enclosed as fields by the 14th century, while some farm records go back to the 13th century. Though Ms Medlycott was mainly concerned with medieval Essex, she showed that most human activities, even if long gone, have left their traces in our landscape and they continue to do this. Roman salt pans, medieval strip fields and old woodland boundaries can still be traced, but so can disused wartime airfields and 1930s re-settlement schemes.

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