History comes to life in new book

PUBLISHED: 15:22 29 March 2007 | UPDATED: 10:15 31 May 2010

Jacqueline Cooper with a copy of the journal – Pic: Sarah Lucy Brown

Jacqueline Cooper with a copy of the journal - Pic: Sarah Lucy Brown

FASCINATING articles charting Saffron Walden s history from medieval times to the 20th century are included in the new edition of a biannual book. The Saffron Walden Historical Journal has gone from strength to strength since it was revived by the town s

FASCINATING articles charting Saffron Walden's history from medieval times to the 20th century are included in the new edition of a biannual book.

The Saffron Walden Historical Journal has gone from strength to strength since it was revived by the town's historical society in 2001.

Previously called Saffron Walden History, the publication was originally launched in the early 1970s and was printed for about 20 years, before current editor Jacqueline Cooper re-invented it.

Mrs Cooper said: "It had been without an editor for about 10 years and there was a big backlog of research that wasn't being published and we have a lot of interesting stories to tell.

"We have regular writers and there are many people who are fascinated by the town's history and are doing research into their family history.

"The society encourages them to write up their research so it can be read by others."

Mrs Cooper said the latest issue provides a real treat for readers, with topics such as the history of the Bridge End Gardens, timber-framed buildings and the American troops who lived in the town during the Second World War.

"Our writers have combined their talents to offer about 15 different articles in this issue and there are some real goodies for readers," she said.

"Of particular interest to town readers will be three contributions by Martyn Everett on the Civil War, listed buildings and on the experiences of the American forces who stayed in Saffron Walden during the war."

In the publication, Geoffrey Ball contributes the second in his series on the wool industry in Walden, while John Bosworth, Uttlesford District Council's planning officer, unravels the way in which Francis Gibson planned his 19th Century creation, now known as Bridge End Gardens.

The journal also covers the surrounding area, with articles on the Miracle of the Ring associated with Clavering in the time of Edward the Confessor, memories of pre-war childhood in Broxted, near Dunmow, and game-keeping at Audley End.

The Saffron Walden Historical Journal is on sale for £2.50 at Harts in King Street, Saffron Walden Museum, Lankester Antiques, Church Street, and the Tourist Information Centre.

For more information or to contribute to future editions, e-mail the editor at jacqueline.cooper@virgin.net

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