Linton landmark gets listed status

PUBLISHED: 16:32 20 August 2008 | UPDATED: 21:32 31 May 2010

Pepperpot Water Tower gets listed status.
Linton.
August 12, 2008.
Photograph by Michael Boyton.
Pic shows: The tower as seen from Tower View in Linton.
Names (L-R):

Pepperpot Water Tower gets listed status. Linton. August 12, 2008. Photograph by Michael Boyton. Pic shows: The tower as seen from Tower View in Linton. Names (L-R):

AN ICONIC village landmark has been safeguarded for the future after it was awarded listed building status. Linton s water tower, known locally as the pepper pot because of its distinctive dodecagonal design, was granted Grade II Listed Building status fo

AN ICONIC village landmark has been safeguarded for the future after it was awarded listed building status.

Linton's water tower, known locally as the pepper pot because of its distinctive dodecagonal design, was granted Grade II Listed Building status following a campaign from the parish council.

Deputy chairman of Linton Parish Council Esther Cornell said: "We are delighted this iconic building has been given listed building status. It is the only one of its kind and is very important to the village."

Built more than 70 years ago the 33-metre-high structure provided running water for Linton and the surrounding villages including Abington, Hildersham and the Camps.

Standing tall on Rivey Hill the water tower's prominent position ensures its mark on the Linton landscape and in the minds of the people.

"It has come to mean a lot to the people who live here and many local organisations have used the pepper pot as part of their logo," said Cllr Cornell.

The tower was built as part of the Linton water scheme - a council-led project set up after water shortages in the area during the 1920s and 1930s.

Construction of the tower, which can hold up to 87,500 gallons of water, began in 1935 with the work being done by H J Paintin Ltd, Linton builders and undertakers. The workforce was drawn mainly from local families and the tower was completed in 1936.

Local historian Garth Collard said that although building the brickwork around the original steel frame cost about £4000 the whole project, including running the pipes to the surrounding villages, came in at £42,000.

The tower stopped serving Linton in the 1960s, but is still owned by the Cambridge Water Company.

An application was submitted by the parish council to English Heritage to protect the tower last August. The Grade II status was granted earlier this month.

At a meeting of Linton Parish Council last Thursday Cllr Cornell said the tower was a striking example of Art Deco design and, unusually for its date, was constructed in brick rather than concrete in order to harmonise with the landscape.

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