Man who raped 13-Year-Old girl is jailed

PUBLISHED: 09:10 08 December 2009 | UPDATED: 22:04 31 May 2010

A FORMER Saffron Walden man has been convicted of raping a 13-year-old girl six years ago, and jailed for 10 years. David Lockwood, who was brought up in the town on his father s farm and went to Waterside public school, near Bishop s Stortford, was told

A FORMER Saffron Walden man has been convicted of raping a 13-year-old girl six years ago, and jailed for 10 years.

David Lockwood, who was brought up in the town on his father's farm and went to Waterside public school, near Bishop's Stortford, was told by the judge he had not used extreme force, threats or violence.

"It was simply the man, the adult, overpowering the will of the child. She was not in a position to say no or to resist and you were able, for a few moments, to have your sexual pleasure with her," said Judge Christopher Ball QC

He said the great pity was that Lockwood had not been able to face up to what he had done and made his victim give evidence - which he described as "compelling".

The judge also commented that he had had ended up in the dock as a result of the effects of drink.

Lockwood, of St Osyth, Essex, had pleaded not guilty to two offences in 2003 when the girl was 13 and to one offence in 2004 when she was just 14.

After a five-day trial at Chelmsford Crown Court and two days of deliberations the jury found the 42-year-old father of four, guilty by a majority of 10-2.

The court heard that the girl didn't tell anybody until she mentioned it to her boyfriend when she was 16. She then told her mother in April last year and the family contacted police.

It was also said that Lockwood confessed at the time to his wife Sally that he had "slept with" the complainant. He told her that if she said anything it would tear the family apart.

Mrs Lockwood only mentioned it after the victim made her accusations.

Lockwood denied the allegations when he was arrested on May 8, 2008. He claimed that they had been made up. He claimed that the conversation he had had with his wife was about how the girl had tried to kiss him and he had told her it was inappropriate.

The insurance salesman told the court he was born in Epping but brought up in Saffron Walden and attended schools in that town and then Waterside School until he was 14. The family then moved to Clacton.

He said he studied motor mechanics at Harlow College at 16 and worked for a company in Colchester before switching careers to insurance. He was now working for a firm in Billericay.

Lockwood told the jury he "absolutely did not" rape the girl and claimed that the allegations had been fabricated.

In her evidence the teenager, now 19, said she now realised she should have gone to the police earlier. "I now realise it was wrong what he was doing and I should not have put up with it," she said.

Mrs Lockwood, who is divorcing her husband, told the court she was "gobsmacked" when he told her "I've slept with X". She told the jury it was easier to bury it than deal with it and so she kept it to herself until it came out from the girl herself.

She denied that her husband had told her in 2003 that the girl had tried to kiss him and he had told her it was inappropriate. "I feel guilty that I didn't mention it earlier," she added.

Mitigating, David Burgess said Lockwood's life was now in ruins. His marriage was over and he probably would not see his own children for many years.

The judge also commented that a huge number of sex offences now came before the courts "as more and more victims feel able to raise complaints even when they have been silent for many years".

"We all know how difficult these cases are but so many are truly made out and there was little doubt here," he said.

The judge also ordered Lockwood to sign the sex offenders' register for life.


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