Ofsted: Stansted college is 'failing' pupils

PUBLISHED: 11:20 16 February 2010 | UPDATED: 22:08 31 May 2010

Ofsted: Stansted Mountfitchet Maths and Computing College could be subject to special measures

Ofsted: Stansted Mountfitchet Maths and Computing College could be subject to special measures

A STANSTED college is failing to give its pupils an acceptable standard of education according to a government watchdog. The Mountfitchet Mathematics and Computing College on Forest Hall Road has been recommended for special measures by the independent

A STANSTED college is "failing to give its pupils an acceptable standard of education" according to a government watchdog.

The Mountfitchet Mathematics and Computing College on Forest Hall Road has been recommended for special measures by the independent schools inspector Ofsted.

The school's performance was judged to be inadequate (grade 4) in several key areas including its overall effectiveness, its capacity for improvement and the quality of its leadership.

The report, which was published last week, said: "Students join the college with attainment that is close to the national average. By the time they leave Year 11, their attainment is below average."

Furthermore, it added that the people responsible for leading, managing and governing the school were not "demonstrating the capacity to secure the necessary improvement".

In the light of the critical report, and in accordance with the Education Act 2005, Her Majesty's Chief Inspector has said that the school requires to be put under special measures - meaning that it will receive compulsory additional support until the situation improves.

Although the report acknowledged that there were "pockets of good practice" it said that "too many lessons are barely satisfactory and lack the challenge needed to promote good learning".

The inspectors noted that the students demonstrated a positive attitude to college, but they were largely critical of the standard of teaching.

"Much teaching does not inspire or challenge students and, in consequence, although they are receptive and often well-behaved in lessons, the progress students make in classrooms is frequently inadequate," the report said.

The inspectors said that the standard of students' education had declined since its last inspection, but they acknowledged that there were some areas that are succeeding.

"Students feel safe in school and know who to turn to for advice and help," said the report. "Students who have dyslexia and other significant needs are carefully assessed and benefit from support that is well tailored to their needs.

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