Stansted to become first airport to convert coffee waste into solid biofuels

The airport will work in partnership with recycling company bio-bean, based in Cambridgeshire. Photo

The airport will work in partnership with recycling company bio-bean, based in Cambridgeshire. Photo: CONTRIBUTED - Credit: Archant

London Stansted Airport is set to become the world’s first airport which will convert all its coffee waste into solid biofuels starting this month.

Stansted will be the worlds first airport to convert all coffee waste into solid biofuels. Photo: CO

Stansted will be the worlds first airport to convert all coffee waste into solid biofuels. Photo: CONTRIBUTED - Credit: Archant

The conversion will take place from today (Monday) in partnership with the world's biggest recycler of coffee grounds, Bio-bean, based in Huntington, Cambridgeshire.

Steve Griffiths, London Stansted's chief operating officer, said: "This exciting new partnership is the perfect example of what is possible if we think a bit differently, and we are proud to be the first UK airport to convert its coffee waste to fuel.

"We are always looking at new and innovative ways to reduce waste and our impact on the environment and are extremely proud of our track record and commitment to sending zero waste to landfill."

Currently, Stansted airport passengers drink over six million cups of coffee every year, producing 150 tonnes of coffee waste.

The first thousands of logs resulting from the recycling process will be distributed to local reside

The first thousands of logs resulting from the recycling process will be distributed to local residents. Photo: CONTRIBUTED - Credit: Archant


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The airport's 21 coffee shops, restaurants and bars will separate the coffee grounds before they are sent to bio-bean's hi-tech processing facility. The grounds are then turned into coffee logs. Each log is made from the grounds of around 25 coffee cups. They can be used in domestic wood burners and multi-fuel stoves as a more sustainable and environmentally-friendly alternative to conventional fuels.

Recycling these coffee grounds is estimated to save 80 per cent of CO2e (carbon dioxide equivalent) emissions than if they were sent to the landfill. It also saves 70 per cent of the emissions created when sent to anaerobic digestion facilities, where they are typically mixed with food waste.

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George May, director of Bio-bean, said: "We're thrilled to have our local international airport choose to recycle its spent coffee grounds with bio-bean.

"Stansted's commitment to recycling its coffee waste is a step in the right direction for the aviation industry, and one we hope will serve as a catalyst for others to follow suit."

As the scheme is introduced, the airport is giving 2,000 of the new coffee logs away to both staff and locals. The airport will work with local partners to distribute them to residents, in an attempt to help them keep warm during winter months.

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