'Long struggle' ends in success for group as donations reach Nepal

PUBLISHED: 07:41 14 November 2019

Metal sheets sent to help the victims of the earthquake in Nepal

Metal sheets sent to help the victims of the earthquake in Nepal

Archant

Metal sheets for roofing have been provided for victims of the earthquake in Nepal.

Metal sheets sent to help the victims of the earthquake in NepalMetal sheets sent to help the victims of the earthquake in Nepal

The gift is from the Tangting Twinning Association launched in 2007 at Carver Barracks and from people in Debden, Wimbish and Wendens Ambo.

A ceremony of gratitude was organised by the village. The earthquake in April 2015 killed 9,000 people and injured 22,000. The response from Uttlesford was immediate. More than £23,000 was raised by the twinning association from local people. The (now closed) Herts and Essex Observer raised £7,000 with a quiz night and a Wendens Ambo group gave their charity fund of £3,500. At the Hatherley Care Home in Saffron Walden, with several Nepalese staff, manager, Jan Armstrong, led a collection of blankets and clothing and worked with Tangting to get the items to Nepal.

But the twinning association says it has taken four years to get some vital materials to the region.

Tina Knight, president of the Tangting Twinning Association, said: "The Nepalese government has been doing its best with limited financial resources to address this major catastrophe but there is still so much suffering that people are unaware of.

Metal sheets sent to help the victims of the earthquake in NepalMetal sheets sent to help the victims of the earthquake in Nepal

"We have managed at long last to supply much needed metal sheets, the main source of roofing and shelter, to a remote village called Keprung in the Gorkha district."

Ms Knight added: "Unfortunately, governments often hinder efforts as many NGOs working overseas find out.

"First a tariff was put on donations of goods being sent from round the world which meant the smaller charities were unable to find the cash for this so they stopped sending goods.

"Then, the Indian government put a blockade on desperately-needed supplies.

"It has been a long struggle to get the necessary equipment and permits and reach the remote and badly affected villages. For a number of years, these villagers have been living in the open with very little shelter from the cold winters and hunger has been a real problem.

"The joy of the people at receiving these meagre offerings is humbling. The Wenden Ambo donation was used towards this particular venture and, we hope to be able to continue supplying further help."

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Saffron Walden Reporter