Are we being told truth over DNA?

PUBLISHED: 13:47 21 December 2006 | UPDATED: 10:03 31 May 2010

IT HAS come to my attention that police investigating the rave at Great Chesterford are asking young people they interview for DNA samples. The justification for this is apparently to find the few who may have spat at, thrown urine at, or bled over police

IT HAS come to my attention that police investigating the rave at Great Chesterford are asking young people they interview for DNA samples. The justification for this is apparently to find the few who may have spat at, thrown urine at, or bled over police during their reportedly heavy-handed approach in dispersing the crowd.

My son was among those who had their DNA taken when asked for a witness statement, although he is suspected of no crime against the police.

When he asked what would happen to his DNA sample he was told that if he ticked the appropriate box, this would not be kept and stored on a national database.

I have grave concerns about the need to take DNA samples to find the perpetrators of this crime when it seems they could have been reprimanded on the spot and I find it hard to believe that, in this time of increased surveillance of the population as a whole, that these samples will not find their way onto a national database.

The idea of a national DNA database fills me with dread, and is certainly something that should not be undertaken without full consultation of the entire population.

While many of us may willingly give DNA samples to help in reprimand of a murderer or rapist, I feel that in this case the justification is not sufficient.

I have taken this matter up with the local MP, the chief of police for Essex and the national press as I do not think we should be asked to provide DNA for trivial purposes, and I suspect we are not being told the truth when we are told these samples are not available for future use.

A Sterling

Artisans Dwellings

Saffron Walden

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