Burgled in her sleep

PUBLISHED: 12:27 10 July 2008 | UPDATED: 14:07 10 May 2010

I write in agreement with Daughter burgled in her sleep (Reporter, July 3). I can only imagine how harrowing it must have been for your daughter and, indeed, your whole family. Personally I don t believe that the money saved by turning off the street

I write in agreement with 'Daughter burgled in her sleep' (Reporter, July 3).

I can only imagine how harrowing it must have been for your daughter and, indeed, your whole family.

Personally I don't believe that the money 'saved' by turning off the street lighting can in any way compensate for the cost endured by the general public who pay with the loss of possessions, damage to vehicles and ultimately the lack of safety and security.

With the streets being so dark in the dead of night, it offers thieves and thugs the cover of darkness and the anonymity that they require to continue their spate of crime undetected, it also renders the police force powerless when victims are unable to provide any details of the perpetrator due to not being able to see them.

What has happened to the money that is not being spent on the street lighting? I don't see an increase in policing, or a reduction in the council tax.

And, more to the point, in the current 'Health and Safety gone mad' world we live in - isn't plunging an entire town into darkness a bit of an infringement on the right of residents who pay for the lights to be on?

With crime so heavily on the increase in all areas across the UK, why do councils see the need to aid the criminals by providing them with the ideal circumstances to perform their 'work'. Is it any surprise that the world has 'career criminals'?

Until you are a victim yourself, you can never fully appreciate the trauma caused by, as you so rightly put it, someone invading your house.

Yet if we were to retaliate ourselves, we would be in the wrong. It's madness!

Name and address supplied

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Saffron Walden Reporter