REVIEW: The Day Shall Come, the film is enlightening but not as sharp as Four Lions

PUBLISHED: 10:45 11 November 2019

The Day Shall Come

The Day Shall Come

Archant

Brass Eye creator Chris Morris returns to the big screen with his second full length feature, which stars Anna Kendrick and Marchánt Davis in the lead roles.

Brass Eye creator Chris Morris returns to the big screen with his second full length feature, which stars Anna Kendrick and Marchánt Davis in the lead roles.

When an impoverished preacher from the Miami projects is offered cash to save his family from eviction, he has no idea that he is set to become a pawn in an elaborate FBI sting.

The government agency plans to fund his madcap revolutionary dreams, in order to class him as a domestic terrorist and arrest him. All because it's easier than hunting down real criminals.

The absurdist nature of the plot will be familiar to fans of Morris, but like his previous work, it has a basis in truth. As the film's tagline puts it, this is a comedy based on a hundred true stories.

Davis stars as Moses the eccentric preacher, who is full of grand and outlandish ideas for revolution, but whose non violent mantra, doesn't quite fit with the FBI's agenda.

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Guns are banned from his village, and even when coerced into purchasing a shipment, he insists that he plans to paint them and use them as fence posts.

Newcomer Davis is excellent and surely destined for bigger things. He portrays Moses as a strong but likeable family man with delusions of grandeur. Delivering even the most ridiculous of lines with absolute deadpan.

Anna Kendrick, the most familiar face here, provides support alongside Denis O'Hare and Adam David Thompson, who make up the hapless but conniving FBI team.

The film's main problem is that it covers many of the same themes as Morris's BAFTA winning 2010 debut Four Lions, and despite a number of good performances it never reaches the highs of its predecessor.

The writer/director's cynical world view is once again apparent throughout. However the script is not as quite as sharp or funny as it needs to be and does drag somewhat as it heads towards its rather cold and dispassionate conclusion.

With The Day Shall Come, Morris provides a bitter sweet absurdist satire, which enlightens but fails to live up to its potential.

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