Cambridge Festival of Ideas will look at technology versus humans - will artificial intelligence decide the law in future?

PUBLISHED: 11:40 25 September 2019 | UPDATED: 10:51 26 September 2019

Could artificial intelligence do away with the need for judges?

Could artificial intelligence do away with the need for judges?

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Caroline Criado Perez, the author of Invisible Women, will be one of the speakers at Cambridge Festival of Ideas.

From October 14-27, there will be a series of free, one-hour talks open to all. This year's theme is technology and where is it taking us.

The author of Invisible Women will speak at Cambridge Festival of IdeasThe author of Invisible Women will speak at Cambridge Festival of Ideas

Caroline Criado Perez, the author of Invisible Women, will be one of the speakers at Cambridge Festival of Ideas.

From October 14-27, there will be a series of free, one-hour talks open to all. This year's theme is technology and where is it taking us.

Criado Perez, whose book pointed out just how many safety devices - including seat belts in cars - are designed for men's bodies, will be

in conversation with Profession Ann Copestake, head of computer science and technology at Cambridge.

They will discuss whether women are being sidelined by the technology revolution. Saturday, October 19 at the Law Faculty on the Sidgwick Site, 10, West Road, CB3 9DZ 11am-noon.

Could artificial intelligence define the law, now decided by human judges and lawyers?

Dr Christopher Markou, from the Faculty of Law at Cambridge, examines whether AI could, and should, replace human judges and lawyers, and what that would mean for democracy and the rule of law.

This lecture, called Lex Ex Machina, is at The Old Divinity School in All Saints Passage CB2 1TP, on October 18 from 6pm-7pm.

You may also want to watch:

What does a year's worth of news look like?

What information are we being drip-fed hour-by-hour and what sort of picture does it paint of life today?

Every day during 2018, artist Robert Good collected the headlines offered to him by the Google News feed and compiled them into a book called Breaking - described as a mesmerising mix of sport, fashion, gossip and gloom.

Good will discuss the results of his project and the conclusions he drew after collecting over 13,000 headlines, published stories, opinion pieces and gossip. He reflects on the state of the news industry as it grapples with fake news and clickbait and attempts to move from print to digital format.

Good is an artist based in Cambridge. He is interested in the frailties of language and the problems of knowledge. He is editor of A New Dictionary of Art.

In a talk called Hate speech, Xenophobia and Trolls on October 24, author and philosopher Dr Andy Martin hosts a discussion with Professors Mary Beard and Rae Langton from the University of Cambridge and journalists Sean O'Grady and Kuba Shand-Baptiste from The Independent.

John Paul Satre said Hell is other people and if he were around now, he might have added that they are even worse on line.

From 6pm, the talk is in the Fisher Building in St John's College (main entrance in Trinity Street), Cambridge, CB2 1TP.

The talks are free, mostly for adults and you need to book on 01223 766766.

For full programme see: www.festivalofideas.cam.ac.uk.

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